After Drawing Controversy, Indie Film "Fisting" Changes Its Title

After Drawing Controversy, Indie Film "Fisting" Changes Its Title

As Shakespeare said, what's in a name?

The Cinema One Originals Film Festival is taking place in Manila next week, and one of the indie films has gotten more attention the rest of the lineup. Why? It was initially titled Fisting. But the title didn’t stay like that for long. Read on to learn more about the Fisting title change. 

(For those of you who aren’t acquainted with the term, fisting is the act of putting a fist inside a sexual partner’s ass or vagina.)

We suspect that folks at Cinema One either weren’t familiar with the term or didn’t think that it would attract so much attention. But after the internet blew up after the publicity materials surfaced, the title was changed to simply Never Tear Us Apart.

Here’s the poster, which has been taken down after the announcement of the title change:

After Drawing Controversy, Indie Film

Image: Facebook

At first glance, the film looks like a G-rated family film, but upon closer look, the hills are clearly a butt, the road’s a bondage choker, and the clouds are dicks.

Here’s a less cryptic poster:

After Drawing Controversy, Indie Film

Image: Facebook

Why was it called “Fisting” in the first place? Here’s the film’s synopsis (emphasis ours):

Q is an aging spy in search of a monster known as The Shadow – a rumored darkness fabricated by the media as a murderer with a grudge against promiscuous women. His wife, M, is taunted by a haunted closet and low television signal range in their mountain top mansion. Alex, their son, is your typical boy at the verge of maturity experimenting both sexually and emotionally. Things head south for the family when The Shadow impregnates M and Q must find a cure in time for Alex’s college graduation at week’s end. The game then finally begins.

In these dire straits, Q begins the process of fisting. He lays out the bodies of evidence before him: creatures hidden in museums, the difficult man befriended by his son, and ladies of the night who sit on hard secrets. He eases into them like a man carefully dipping his hand into a tub of warm water. But Q is still sucked violently into this dark hole, this backdoor cavity of secrets and lies. As with all family dramas, it will all climax with blood-curdling screams.

Fisting Title Change: An Issue of Censorship?

“It is sad and unfortunate,” read a statement on the film’s official Facebook page on the Fisting title change. “The film is so much more than the title and the poster. And because we understand that they are not for everyone, we are doing these necessary steps so that we can continue the dialogue we wanted to have with the audience through our film.”

While some netizens are calling this renaming an act of censorship, Director Whammy Alcazaren said in a press conference that the Fisting title change wasn’t forced. “Although we understand why we chose this title, we also understand that it’s not for everyone,” Alcazaren said.

However, the Movie and Television Review and Classification Board (MTRCB) reportedly warned the film’s producers for circulating publicity materials that hadn’t been submitted and approved.

In the memorandum, the MTRCB cited a 1986 decree that said that “trailers and publicity materials for movie and television programs must strictly be made suitable for a General Audience (‘G’) classification.” The memorandum also stated that materials that don’t aren’t G-rated will not be approved for exhibition in movie houses, televisions, print publications, and “other related media”.

While most people couldn’t believe that the film was a real thing when they first saw the posters, people who are familiar with the rationale behind the title were disappointed at the change.

Never Tear Us Apart was shot entirely with an iPhone X. It stars Ricky Davao, Meryl Soriano, and Jasmine Curtis Smith.

H/T: Rappler, Inquirer